Quality Civic Engagement Blog

The Value of Engagement

Posted by Matt Fulton on Feb 18, 2019 12:27:24 PM

This post originally appeared on the National League of Cities CitiesSpeak blog. You can find the original post here.

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Topics: informed community, communications strategy, civic engagement

Location, Location, Location!

Posted by Cory Poris Plasch on Aug 21, 2018 2:15:24 PM

Social media is reactionary. Often times, its main purpose is to let you know that an issue exists, but without the specifics to determine how significant the problem is and who is impacted. Understandably so, city staff and elected officials are therefore reluctant to engage the public on social media - leading to an information gap.

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Topics: open government, informed community, digital engagement, communications strategy, civic engagement

Taming the Social Media Beast

Posted by Cory Poris Plasch on Aug 2, 2018 9:59:19 AM
A quiet day in the office is suddenly interrupted by your coworker’s worried face at your door. “Have you checked out the ‘What’s happening in your community’ Facebook page? The information some people are sharing about our new initiative isn’t correct and people are getting really upset. I’ve already gotten three phone calls this morning from angry residents and now the mayor is getting them too. How are we going to handle this?”
Facebook has become the nemesis of many, particularly in our current highly politicized environment. Unfortunately, it is also where many people get information without always checking the accuracy of the source. As a result, government struggles with getting accurate information to residents and particularly doing so in a timely fashion.

Many in government have since decided to not engage with their community except through their website and newsletters, which risks narrowing the conversation to a small (but often vocal) set of the community. An alternative would be to develop a game plan for how to engage the entire community, and not just the vocal few. The key is to do so in a way that doesn’t rely exclusively on social platforms like Facebook, which are not designed to facilitate constructive input. Those communities who have done this have been able to take these situations and use it for constructive input for decision making.

Imagine what would happen if, in response to the above example, you posted the following on the “what’s happening” Facebook page: “Thank you for your interest in this initiative. You can learn more about it on our website, and also weigh in on several questions we’ve posted for community input. Please participate here (link) so we can gather community insight.”

Micro-surveys are emerging as a way to take back the conversation and provide additional information as well as gain valuable community input. But this is a path that requires careful navigation to ensure a balanced response, and not just an avalanche of opinions from the vocal few.

If you would like to learn more about how to gain constructive input in a timely manner, check out our blog or LinkedIn page in the months of August and September as we continue our 6-part series on “Taming the Social Media Beast”, showing best practices in how to use polls and surveys to engage your community.
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Topics: government transparency, informed community, digital engagement, community, communications strategy, civic engagement

New Case Study Out Now!

Posted by Nick Jeffress on Jan 24, 2018 9:12:00 AM

As governments across the country grapple with ways to effectively engage a decreasing number of locally involved citizens, the availability of modern tools seem to always lag behind those which citizens desire. The rise in social media use to almost 70% of the adult population(1) has created expectations and habits among residents that may not lead to productive discourse or feedback. Popular social networks make it difficult to ensure that outbound information is accurate and objective. These platforms are also not designed for civic communication - too frequently, the most used channels devolve into negative discourse. All of this means the information about local sentiment being relayed to municipal decision-makers on important local issues is of questionable utility.

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Topics: informed community, communications strategy, civic engagement

Why Asking Matters

Posted by Nick Jeffress on May 23, 2017 9:24:46 AM

In our last post, we discussed the steps localities need to take to effectively engage their citizens and close the feedback loop. Following this process is an important first step to online citizen engagement and once you start down that process, you'll find yourself with many more valuable opportunities to engage with your constituents.

Sometimes this can create uncertainty, as it may not be clear exactly how to take advantage of the new opportunities. This uncertainty takes many forms, from “what should I ask” to “how should I ask” and everything in between. We’re going to use this space to address these two most common concerns, and end with a challenge to see where others have had success in online question asking!

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Topics: civic engagement, municipal polling, communications strategy

    

The Future of Civic Engagement

Polco makes civic communication easier, more inclusive and better organized.
Voter-verified community engagement has never been this easy! At Polco, we want to help your local government increase online engagement and connect with more citizens. You can find out more in the links below:

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